Image from page 287 of "Modern cabinet work, furniture & fitments; an account of the theory & practice in the production of all kinds of cabinet work & furniture with chapters on the growth and progress of design and construction; illustrated by over 1000


Related Images

image d'antan image image image image image image image image image image image image image image image ClubImage2502__011a image ClubImage2502__005a image


License: No Copyright
Author: Internet Archive Book Images
Description:
Identifier: moderncabinetwor00well Title: Modern cabinet work, furniture & fitments; an account of the theory & practice in the production of all kinds of cabinet work & furniture with chapters on the growth and progress of design and construction; illustrated by over 1000 practical workshop drawings, photographs & original designs Year: 1922 (1920s) Authors: Wells, Percy A Hooper, John, b. 1882 Subjects: Cabinetwork Furniture making Publisher: Philadelphia, J.B. Lippincott Company Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: urface should then be toothed with a toothing plane,a small plane with single, upright blade, which is milledor grooved on the face, so that the edge has sawlike points(see sketch). In sharpening this plane, the burr mustnot be rubbed down as in a cutting blade. The tooth-ing should be done both up and down and across the board,and all over it. The surface should then be sized with alittle thin glue, and when dry it may be necessary to slightlyToothing Iron. tooth it again as the sizing may have caused some irregu-larities to rise on the face. The veneer too may need tooth-ing to remove any rough surfaces left by the saw. A careful workman willexamine both wood and veneer before laying. To cut thin veneers a sharpchisel and a straightedge are the best tools to use, but in the thicker or saw-cutsheets it is better to use a saw, either dovetail or tenon, or a veneer saw shownin f. 1, next page. When veneers are dry they buckle and split easily, and needvery careful handling and cutting. Text Appearing After Image: VENEERS AND VENEERING 213 Laying.—Two methods are used: one with a hammer for knife-cutveneers, and the other with cauls under pressure for the thicker or saw-cut sheets. The hammer is usually home-made, of beech or ash, with a blade ofrfr-in. steel let into the head, and pinned through as shown in f. 2 below. Theedge of the blade should be rounded to prevent cutting. Other tools forhammer veneering are a hot flat iron and a swab or sponge. When every-thing is quite ready—glue, clean, hot, and fairly thin—cover the ground quicklywith a large brush, and see that it is free from any little specks of grit; thencarefully lay the veneer on, flatting it with the hand, damp it with hot water,and pass the flat iron over rapidly without much pressure. Hold the hammerin the right hand, with the left pressing on the head, and starting in the centrework it backwards and forwards with a zigzag motion (f. 2) towards theoutside edges, going over the whole surface quickly, and repeating the str Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Credit:

Select Image Size
Square 75X75 View Download
Large Square 150X150 View Download
Thumbnail 68X100 View Download
Small 162X240 View Download
Small 320 216X320 View Download
Small 400 270X400 View Download
Medium 338X500 View Download
Original 370X548 View Download